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People dislike Clinton and Trump even more now than they did in June

Americans weren’t very happy with their choices for president back in June … and they’re apparently even less happy with those choices now.

About 63 percent of Americans surveyed in a new Pew Research Center poll said they were either “not too satisfied” or “very unsatisfied” with the current options among presidential candidates.

That’s compared to 33 percent of respondents saying they were “very” or “fairly” satisfied.

And those options, in alphabetical order, in case you need to catch up:

  • Hillary Clinton – Democrat
  • Gary Johnson – Libertarian
  • Jill Stein – Green
  • Donald Trump – Republican

This isn’t normal for recent elections

Pew points out that, when it did this poll back in June, 58 percent of people said they weren’t satisfied, and 40 percent said they were satisfied – and at the time, the number of people who felt satisfied was the lowest in the past couple decades.

Since then, the dissatisfied group has gotten bigger, while the satisfied group has gotten smaller.

Pew says a dramatic drop like this as the election gets closer isn’t historically common (see the graph from Pew above). During the six presidential contests Pew has data for since 1992, voter satisfaction either held steady or went up as Election Day neared.

The party doesn’t matter

This dissatisfaction is across both parties.

Of the people who identify as Republican or Republican-leaning, 36 percent are satisfied and 59 percent are not satisfied.

Of the people who identify as Democrat or Democrat-leaning, 35 percent are satisfied and 61 percent are not satisfied.

Not enough key policy, too negative

A few other interesting findings:

  • 75 percent of voters think this election is “interesting” – compared to 16 percent who described it as “dull.”
  • 64 percent said the election isn’t focused enough on important policy debates. Democrats were much more likely to feel that way (71 percent) than Republicans (53 percent).
  • The race is widely viewed as too negative: 71 percent described it as such, while 23 percent called it not too negative. Again, the view was more widely held by Democrats (75 percent) than Republicans (65 percent).

The polling was done by telephone (cell and landline), surveying 1,201 adults living in all 50 states plus Washington, D.C. from Aug. 23-Sept. 2. The polls were done in English and Spanish.

More on voting

The election is Nov. 8. Find resources and more political coverage at our sister site, GoVoteMN.com. You can also watch this video that’ll explain how to register to vote. Early and absentee voting (meaning you vote by mail) starts Sept. 23.

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