E. coli closes a popular Minneapolis beach

E. coli can come from a number of different sources – including poop, farm runoff, or even soil.
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High levels of bacteria has closed a popular Minneapolis beach.

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) closed the Lake Hiawatha Beach Tuesday because E. coli bacteria "exceeded state specified guidelines," an email statement says.

E. coli, of course, can come from a number of different sources – including human poop, bird poop, farm runoff, or even soil.

When bacteria levels are too high, it can make people sick. That's why the MPRB monitors bacteria at the city's beaches weekly from June through August, and will close them if bacteria levels are high.

No illnesses were reported as a result of swimming at the Lake Hiawatha Beach, MPRB says. The beach will reopen once bacteria levels are within the state guidelines. They noted all other public beaches and the Webber Natural Swimming Pool are still open.

The park board says bacteria typically gets elevated at beaches after it rains a lot, and it will return to normal levels within 24-48 hours. The Minnesota Department of Health says bacteria levels can also rise if the water gets contaminated by a sewage pipe break.

For information on bacteria monitoring at other beaches in Minnesota, click here.

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