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Facebook blames a 'tiny group' of users for lots of obnoxious spam

Here's what Facebook says it's doing so you see it less.

Facebook is at war with "low-quality links" – URLS that take you to those ad-filled, blatantly sexualized or shocking websites that everybody hates.

And the company is blaming a small amount of people for spamming everyone else with those links.

Facebook in a recent update said it's making some algorithm changes to stop these people from spreading so much "clickbait, sensationalism, and misinformation."

What's happening

"Our research shows that there is a tiny group of people on Facebook who routinely share vast amounts of public posts per day, effectively spamming people’s feeds," Adam Mosseri, VP of Facebook's news feed, explained in the update. And the posts they do share tend to be the low-quality crappy ones.

Mosseri didn't offer any concrete figures about how big this "tiny group" is. But Facebook recently revealed it has 2 billion active users, so that gives us some context.

Whatever the number is, Facebook says it will now deprioritize links those people are sharing more often than normal users, so they don't appear in your feed as often.

"One of our core News Feed values is that News Feed should be informative," Mosseri added, before reiterating the goal of limiting "the spread of problematic links such as clickbait, sensationalism and misinformation."

Now, it's possible these people don't actually know what they're sharing, considering 59 percent of all links shared on Facebook never actually are clicked. But then again, there's evidence spamming can make you some money.

This 2013 study found garbage links on fan pages, which send people to third-party websites, generated $200 million in a year.

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