Update: Student who said 'I would like to behead' Trump in yearbook apologizes

"I was making a joke that shouldn't have been made to a friend, and I didn't know it would be put out to the world."
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A Minnesota high school student is apologizing for a comment she made in the school yearbook.

Earlier this week, Brainerd High School came under fire for a page in the yearbook that asked students to state their opinion about President Trump. One of the four commenters, a sophomore, was quoted saying "I would like to behead him."

A photo of the page sparked outrage online and led to protests outside the school. The school said it was looking into how the comments made it into the yearbook, and the Secret Service was even called in to investigate.

Now the student who made the comment is apologizing. In an interview with KSTP, Camaryn Eberline said it was just a joke, and she didn't know it was going to end up in the yearbook.

Eberline told the station she was approached in the fall by a student who asked her what she thought of Trump.

"She never said it was going in the yearbook, she didn't have a piece of paper writing it down," she said.

The 15-year-old added that she's had to deactivate her social media accounts after receiving hateful messages and death threats and wishes she had never said anything.

"I did not mean that I would like to behead the president. I was making a joke that shouldn't have been made to a friend, and I didn't know it would be put out to the world," she said. You can watch the full interview here.

KSTP and GoMN had previously chosen not to disclose the student's name or identity, but now the family has asked for it to be public, in order to clear her name.

You can read the original story and update from earlier this week below.

The U.S. Secret Service is investigating a quote that made it into the Brainerd High School yearbook.

In a section about noteworthy events from 2016-17, a page in the school's yearbook asks students to state their views of the new president, and a comment from one female student said: "I would like to behead him. I do not like him."

The school said it was looking into the incident, and now the Brainerd Dispatch is reporting the Secret Service is investigating too. Mark Johnson, assistant special agent in charge at the agency's field office in Minneapolis, told the paper he couldn't comment on the investigation, but did say agents may go to the city where the threat was made as part of their investigation.

You can read the original story from earlier Friday below. 

Brainerd High School is at the center of a social media storm after its yearbook posted a comment from a student who said "I would like to behead" President Donald Trump.

In a section about noteworthy events from 2016-17, a page in the school's yearbook asks students to state their views of the new president, and a comment from one female student said: "I would like to behead him. I do not like him."

A picture of the page was shared on social media and has spread like wildfire, even reaching – among others – Happy Days actor and prominent Trump supporter Scott Baio who commented about it on Twitter.

Many have been questioning how the comment made it through the editing process, with Minnesota GOP Sen. Dan Hall saying: "Threatening our president in the Brainerd yearbook is okay with staff? Who will lose their job? Who okayed this? Guiding our children?"

Brainerd Public Schools issued a statement on Friday, saying it is investigating how the comment got into the yearbook and will change its policies to ensure it won't happen again.

"The district does not support or otherwise endorse any disrespectful or politically based statements that are in the yearbook and apologizes for the statements that were included," it says.

"While the district supports free speech, the disrespectful statements in the yearbook are contrary to the basic educational mission of the district and should not have been included in a school-sponsored publication."

KARE 11 is reporting a group of Brainerd High School parents will be marching on the school demanding answers Friday afternoon.

People commenting on Brainerd's Facebook statement describe the yearbook as a "disgrace" and something that has brought "nationwide ridicule on the school."

Another commenter said although the yearbook "was taking things too far," the issue has been "blown way out of proportion."

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