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Jeez, they're bringing 'Fargo' back for a third season

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We don't know the details behind the Waffle Hut murders yet, but we know the current season of "Fargo" will not be the show's last.

The television series that brings the Coen brothers' quirky mixture of Minnesota, murder, and dark comedy to the small screen will be back for a third season. As TV Guide reports, the FX Network announced Monday it has ordered a new batch of episodes from the show's creator, Noah Hawley.

The Hollwood Reporter says it's not surprising given the show's success – season one hauled in 18 Emmy nominations and three wins, while reviews aggregated by the site Metacritic show the current season of "Fargo" is the most acclaimed series of 2015.

Ratings-wise, the Reporter says "Fargo" is no juggernaut, but it's shown "a very steady and stable audience."

So, the show will return. But its cast and its setting are anyone's guess right now.

MPR News notes that while the action in season one ping-ponged between Bemidji and Duluth, season two (episodes are available here) is set 36 years earlier in 1979 with the setting moved to the southwestern Minnesota town of Luverne, with other scenes in Fargo and Sioux Falls.

The cast was similarly overhauled from a group that included Billy Bob Thornton and Colin Hanks, to one featuring Kirsten Dunst, Patrick Wilson, and Ted Danson.

Despite its Upper Midwestern settings, both seasons have been shot in the province of Alberta, Canada; although the Calgary Herald says a return there for season three is not a sure thing.

The Star Tribune reports St. Louis Park natives Joel and Ethan Coen – whose Oscar-winning 1996 movie inspired the show – will stay on as executive producers.

Where should season three be set?

Blogger Aaron Brown has a suggestion: Minnesota's Iron Range in the 1950s. Brown writes that the rowdy Range of those days was a far cry from Ozzie and Harriet's world, describing it this way:

"Fast cars and sawdust bars; back roads and wild girls. You had the full force of first generation immigrants from around the world intermarrying and breaking up old neighborhoods, mines were shutting down, but new taconite plants glistened on the horizon."

https://twitter.com/minnesotabrown/status/668960581022433280/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

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