Kim Insley speaks about her departure from KARE 11

She left the station abruptly on Oct. 20 after 24 years.
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Kim Insley (second from left) left KARE 11 earlier this month.

Kim Insley (second from left) left KARE 11 earlier this month.

Kim Insley has been speaking about her surprise exit from KARE 11, which shocked viewers who'd followed her career the past few decades.

Insley, who had graced Minnesota TV screens for 24 years and most recently as its sunrise anchor, left the airwaves abruptly on Oct. 20, with KARE 11 announcing a "parting of ways."

KARE's statement included a line "This is in no way a reflection of Kim's many talents," which led many fans to conclude that this parting of ways wasn't necessarily a mutual one.

Insley is one of three Twin Cities TV personalities who have left or changed their jobs recently, with Rachel Slavik leaving WCCO and KSTP's prime-time anchor Bill Lunn is now a field reporter.

KARE hasn't provided any further detail on Insley's departure, with Insley herself cagey about the reason she left. That said, in an interview with the Pioneer Press on Friday she admitted it was "a surprise."

"Yes I was surprised at the development,” she told the newspaper. "They wanted to go a different direction in the mornings and that was a surprise."

Insley says new tech is pressuring local TV

Insley has been cautious about talking in too much detail about leaving the station, using a Facebook video post the day she left to thank her colleagues and Minnesotans for supporting her career.

But she did talk about the TV news industry a little more generally on KQRS, where she spoke about how it has become more challenging in the face of mobile technology and changing tastes among younger consumers.

"People want it right in their hand or whatever screen is right in front of them," she said, adding that as a result local TV companies are seeing their revenues go down and facing pressure to keep up their earnings.

"The only way you can do that, if you can’t figure out the business model, is to deal with the other side of it, and that’s cutting your employment costs and we’ve been seeing that for years now," she told the radio show.

Insley hasn't stopped being a reporter now that she's no longer with KARE. She has been putting her talents to work for followers of her Facebook page, highlighting the Banyan Community charity in a Facebook live video on Sunday evening.

In a response to a comment on another of her posts, Insley said she's not figured out what her next step will be, "but I am excited about the possibilities."

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