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Look at the (adorable) animals the Wildlife Rehab Center admitted this year

This is a muskrat – one of the thousands of animals the center looked at this year.

Less than 10 hours into 2016, the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center of Minnesota saw a brown bat, mallard, and woodpecker brought through its doors.

Throughout the rest of the year, the Roseville nonprofit admitted more than 12,000 additional animals – all of which you can see on its website.

The Wildlife Rehab Center takes in all sick, orphaned or injured wild animals and does its best to treat them. It says it relies entirely on donations to operate.

This past year, the center admitted more than 12,650 animals, ranging from birds to beavers to coyotes to mice to rabbits to woodchucks – the list goes on for a bit longer. You can see them arranged by species here, or search day-by-day admissions here.

It took an estimated 63,500 volunteer hours to make that happen, and cost an average of $,2557 every day, this year-end report says.

The total number of admissions is up significantly from the not-quite-8,000 brought in five years ago.

If you're interested in supporting the Wildlife Rehabilitation Center, click here.

Let's see some adorable animals

Among the most frequent patients in 2016: Eastern cottontail rabbits – one of the most common mammals in the state. They were admitted 3,735 times in 2016.

Next up was the eastern grey squirrel, with 1,548 admissions; followed by mallards (a common duck) with 1,193 admission. (In general, there were quite a lot of birds on the list.)

They saved photos of a few dozen of the visitors, including:

This ridiculously adorable trumpeter swan:

This ... strange-looking (but we're sure still quite lovable) mole:

And this hungry Northern river otter:

As 2017 goes on, the rehab center will update its current admissions page with new patients.

You can also check out its Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for frequent updates throughout the year.

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