MN man defies 28.3 trillion to one odds to win the lottery, twice

28.3 trillion to one represents the odds of a Minnesotan man winning the lottery not once, but twice.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

One in 28,365,785,679,460.

That, if you can't be bothered counting the digits, is roughly one in 28.3 trillion, and it represents the odds of a Minnesota man winning the lottery not once, but twice.

Yes, Anthony Fusaro of Plymouth was the winner of the $874,766 jackpot in the Gopher 5 drawing on Oct. 28, picking five out of five numbers at odds of just more than one in 1.5 million, according to the lottery website.

But his win is all the more unlikely given that in June 2015, Fusaro won a $1 million Mega Millions prize at even greater odds of just under 18.5 million to one.

"I've always believed it would happen again," Fusaro told the Minnesota State Lottery.

Seriously? Because there are 28.3 trillion reasons why it wouldn't.

He used the $1 million he banked last year to pay off his mortgage and his student loans, and put a downpayment on a new home. Fusaro will use his latest win to pay off this mortgage too, as well as the rest of the debts he's accrued.

"It was a great feeling the first time and now that we'll be debt free, it's even better," he said, before adding: "I still think I'm going to do it again."

He bought his winning Gopher 5 ticket at the SuperAmerica at 4325 Peony Lane N. in Plymouth. His winning numbers were 13-18-21-22-38.

On this MoneyMiniBlog, we could only find three things that are less likely to happen than Fusaro's win: Shuffling a deck of cards into sequential order, being hit by a meteor, and picking the perfect NCAA bracket.

Next Up

Mohamed Ibrahim

Missed PAT seals Gophers' fate against Maryland

Mohamed Ibrahim tied a school record with four touchdowns, but the Gophers lost in overtime.

dnr trout stocking helicopter

DNR uses a helicopter to more efficiently stock lakes with trout

In the past, the DNR used airplanes to stock remote lakes with fish, but the survival rate of the fish was only 85%.

steve simon zoom call

Secretary of State explains plans for segregated absentee ballots

Election officials are reminding voters that it's too late to mail in your absentee ballots.

Halloween, trick-or-treating

Osterholm on safe trick-or-treating: 'I would say go ahead with it'

The infectious disease expert's opinion doesn't align with the CDC's guidance.

drop and go ballot plymouth

It's too late to mail your ballot, but you can still vote. Here's how.

Voters can drop off their absentee ballot, vote early in-person or head to the polls on Election Day.

2019-12-11 f1rst Wrestling Hanukka Havok-Darin Kamnetz-154

Dusting itself off after virus blow, F1rst Wrestling returns to the ring this Sunday

Minnesota's premier independent wrestling company was on top of the world before the virus hit.

1024px-McD-McRib

McDonald's is bringing the McRib back in December

It hasn't appeared on menus for eight years.

Apple Valley High School

2 more Twin Cities districts moving to distance learning for grades 6-12

The decision was announced as infection rates in Dakota County rise.

covid-19 testing site sign

Here are the 4 free COVID-19 testing sites in MN for the week of Nov. 2

People don't need to have symptoms or insurance to get tested for free.

Related

MN man defies 28.3 trillion to one odds to win the lottery, twice

28.3 trillion to one represents the odds of a Minnesotan man winning the lottery not once, but twice.

Lottery player, in no hurry, wins big

A Minnesota City man followed his typical lottery routine recently. He knew he had a winning scratch-off ticket, but he didn't scratch off the amount he'd won. He liked the surprise of finding out when he went to claim his winnings at the store. It could wait a day. Then there was a grilled cheese sandwich to eat. It was worth the wait: $100,000.

Father, son each win $100K by playing opposite lottery numbers

The game is called All or Nothing – and this Minnesota family did both.

How low-income home buyers in MN could be hit by one of Trump's first decisions

Low-income, first-time home buyers could have saved hundreds of dollars a year.

Great Scott! MN man wins Back to the Future self-lacing sneakers

Where Aaron Borland's going, he doesn't need roads. But he does need shoes.

010514-A-YG824-004

What's in the $2 trillion COVID-19 aid package passed by Congress?

The bill was signed off by President Donald Trump on Friday.