Minnesota native makes it to 'Biggest Loser' finale after dropping 110 lbs. - Bring Me The News

Minnesota native makes it to 'Biggest Loser' finale after dropping 110 lbs.

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A three-time state swimming champ at Stillwater High School is making great strides on NBC's weight loss challenge series "The Biggest Loser" after beginning the competition at 260 pounds, the Pioneer Press reports.

Rachel Frederickson, who currently works as a voice-over artist in Los Angeles, started her quest to slim down at the beginning of the 15th season of the series in October. In the most recent episode of the show, Frederickson weighed in at 150 pounds – and to top it off, she won the show's first-ever triathlon.

The win qualified Frederickson to be on the show's finale, where she's competing for the $250,000 grand prize against Oklahoma resident David Brown and Bobby Saleem from Chicago.

"The Biggest Loser's" Facebook page has photos chronicling the contestants' transformations, and Frederickson has been updating followers about her progress on Twitter.

The finale airs Tuesday night on NBC, and in the Twin Cities area on KARE 11 at 8 p.m. CT.

According to her show bio, Fredrickson, 24, moved to Germany when she was 18 to pursue a relationship. But when the relationship fell through, Fredrickson gained more than 100 pounds over the next six years.

Her "Biggest Loser" jersey number is 260, which also represents her starting weight.

The Pioneer Press says Fredrickson spent the holidays with her mom in Stillwater and exercised regularly at the Lifetime Fitness in Woodbury. Fredrickson also took the opportunity to work out with Lisa Rambo of Hudson, Wisconsin, who competed on Season 14 of "The Biggest Loser."

Ironically, it was Season 14 of the show that was the turning point for Frederickson. She told the Pioneer Press that she planned on watching the show and losing weight along with the contestants, but instead gained 30 pounds.

During the finale, she took the announcement of the 15th season of the show as sign.

"It was fate," Frederickson told the paper. "I knew I needed to apply."

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