Target's new 'sensory-friendly' clothing line for kids has no tags, flat seams - Bring Me The News

Target's new 'sensory-friendly' clothing line for kids has no tags, flat seams

It's for children who are extra sensitive to touch.
Author:
Publish date:
One of Target's new sensory-friendly long-sleeve shirts, with a close-up of a seam.

One of Target's new sensory-friendly long-sleeve shirts, with a close-up of a seam.

Target has a small new collection of kids' clothing tailored specifically for children that are extra sensitive to touch.

These new "sensory-friendly" items are part of Target's Cat & Jack collection (which has become a $2 billion brand just one year in).

So what does "sensory-friendly" mean, exactly?

The goal is to "minimize discomfort when in contact with the skin," Target's announcement said.

A close-up of the seam on one of the new sensory-friendly shirts.

A close-up of the seam on one of the new sensory-friendly shirts.

Right now the new items are only available on Target.com – you can see the full collection here

Prices are $4.50-$7. There are a few different colors of leggings, plus a dozen T-shirts (five of which have a graphic of some sort).

"It fit Target’s philosophy of making sure all guests feel welcome and included, and we knew Cat & Jack was the perfect place to start," said Julie Guggemos, senior vice president, Product Design & Development, in the announcement. "While it’s just a few pieces in the line, for some families, they’ll make a huge difference."

The STAR Institute says people with Sensory Processing Disorder can find things like clothing or physical contact uncomfortable, and sometimes even unbearable.

KidCompanions lists some specific examples of things that might be unpleasant for children with tactile hypersensitivity. That includes tags/buttons/fabric of clothing items, getting their hair combed or washed, having any substance on their hands, skin/sand/grass on their skin, and more.

Image placeholder title

According to studies referenced by the STAR Institute, at least 5 percent of kids are affected daily by Sensory Processing Disorder (though some cases may be mild), while one in every six kids may experience "sensory symptoms."

"Thank you, Target, for remembering that children with special needs require clothes, too," wrote Meredtih Bland for Scary Mommy. "And thank you for the sensory-sensitive clothes that will make back-to-school shopping slightly more enjoyable for many parents out there."

Target has adaptive clothing coming too

Target's plans for continuing to make Cat & Jack even more inclusive doesn't stop with sensory-friendly items.

Guggemos explained in the announcement the next step will be "adaptive pieces" to help children who have disabilities.

"This could include styles with zip-off sleeves and side openings that make dressing easier, and pieces that open in the back for those lying down or sitting," Guggemos said.

Bland, with Scary Mommy, had a suggestion too:

"(Psst…can you do seamless socks next? Thanks.)"

Next Up

Related