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The Historical Society announced recent grants, here's where the money is going

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Soon, the city of Ranier will have their community building evaluated for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

Hennepin County will be able to hire a historian to help develop a bike tour on the Red River Oxcart Trail, a fur trade route that once ran through Northeast Minneapolis.

And a video collection of Monticello football games will be digitized, saving the films and making them accessible to the public.

These are just a few of the projects that will be funded by the Minnesota Historical Society, which gives out thousands of dollars in grants each year in the name of history.

Preserving history comes with a price

That's $387,359, to be exact.

The Historical Society announced that grants were given to 55 recipients in 31 counties this time around - they present the small grants four times a year.

The money helps nonprofit and educational organizations, government units and tribal organizations to "preserve and share Minnesota history."

These grants are made possible thanks to Minnesota voters, who helped pass the Legacy Amendment in 2008. The amendment increased the state's sales tax by three-eighths of one percent, which doesn't sound like a whole lot, but apparently adds up.

But the Historical Society says each Minnesotan only pays $2.56 per year for the programs, partnerships, and grants - that's less than the price of a dozen eggs.

All of the revenue created by the sales tax increase is divvied up into four different funds: the Clean Water fund, Outdoor Heritage Fund, the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund, and the Parks and Trails Fund.

The Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund receives 19.75 percent of the overall Legacy funding - that amounted to $29 million for fiscal years 2016 and 2017.

You can check out how they plan to spend all of that money here.

Other projects

You can find this quarter's complete list of grant recipients here, but here's a few of them:

Maritime Heritage Minnesota is getting a $9,952 grant to conduct a marine archaeology survey of six suburban Minnesota lakes.

The city of Pipestone will get $10k to hire an architect to assess their water tower, which is listed on the National Register of Historical Places.

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Minnesota is receiving $6,270 to hire an archaeologist to conduct a survey of Dakota and Ojibwe sites in Wadena.

Minnesota State University Mankato will get a $6,175 grant to digitize old issues of the student newspaper "The Reporter" to make them more accessible to the public.

Czech and Slovak Sokol Minnesota will get $10k to document the history of Minnesota polka bands and Czech heritage.

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The Historical Society announced recent grants, here's where the money is going

The Historical Society doles out thousands of dollars in grants four times a year. Here's where the money is going this time around.