Not out of the woods yet: Heavy rain, severe storms possible again Sunday in Minnesota - Bring Me The News

Not out of the woods yet: Heavy rain, severe storms possible again Sunday in Minnesota

The Nemadji River ripped apart some of Hwy. 23 in Carlton County overnight.
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Flash flooding of the Nemadji River in Carlton County tore apart Hwy. 23 near the south fork of the river. 

Flash flooding of the Nemadji River in Carlton County tore apart Hwy. 23 near the south fork of the river. 

Minnesota avoided damaging winds, large hail and the strong tornadoes that the National Weather Service said were possible on Saturday, but extreme rainfall caused flash flooding in parts of northern Minnesota early Sunday morning. 

As seen in the photo above, flash flooding ripped apart some of Hwy. 23 near the south fork of the Nemadji River in Carlton County. For details on roads in southeast Carlton County that are washed out or impassable, click here

Turning attention to Sunday, more heavy rain and another chance of severe storms will impact much of the state. The biggest concern, per the NWS, is the threat for flooding rains, which will once again impact the already saturated areas of central and northeast Minnesota, where an additional 1-2 inches, perhaps more in some areas, could fall. 

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Meanwhile, there is a slight risk for severe storms from southwest to east-central Minnesota, including the metro area, Mankato and Marshall.

Areas shaded in yellow in the map below stand the best chance to see hail and damaging winds, although severe cells should be isolated, according to the Storm Prediction Center.  

Storms are expected to develop during the afternoon and then spread east-southeast, with the severe threat greatest from mid-afternoon to mid-evening, the NWS Twin Cities says

There's also the heat and humidity to deal with again, with heat index values again approaching or exceeding 100 degrees in the metro area, where an excessive heat warning is in effect until 7 p.m.

Here's the simulated radar from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. from NOAA's HRRR model, which is a depiction of what could happen, not what will happen. 

hrrr_ref_frzn_ncus_fh6-14

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