Charges: Ex-Minneapolis cop abused position to obtain illegal drugs

He's also accused of extortion and violating civil rights.
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Federal authorities have charged a former Minneapolis police officer with covertly pocketing narcotics in the line of duty. 

Ty Raymond Jindra, 28, was taken into custody Friday and charged in an 11-count federal indictment, which included six counts of acquiring controlled substances by deception and multiple counts of extortion and deprivation of rights under color of law. 

According to a press release from the U.S. District Court in St. Paul, Jindra abused his position with the Minneapolis Police Department (MPD) from September 2017 through October 2019, during which time he obtained or attempted to obtain "controlled substances including methamphetamine, heroin, oxycodone, cocaine, and other drugs by deception, extortion, and conducting unconstitutional searches and seizures."

During the course of his duties as an MPD officer, the release says, Jindra conducted his scheme by "not reporting, logging, placing into evidence, or informing his partner or other officers" about the controlled substances he confiscated on the job. 

He also obtained the drugs by finding ways to "interact with" or search individuals, vehicles and residences "so that he could surreptitiously recover controlled substances without his partner’s knowledge," according to the U.S. attorney's office. 

Some of these searches were conducted "beyond the scope warranted under the circumstances," prosecutors say, adding that he also turned off his body camera when he swiped some of the drugs.

According to the Star Tribune, Jindra was placed on leave following a federal criminal investigation the previous fall, after having been named in three excessive force complaints "in a short span of time."

The paper says he started with MPD in 2013, and, as of Oct. 23, was no longer on the force. 

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