Counter Stories podcast cuts ties with Minnesota Public Radio - Bring Me The News

Counter Stories podcast cuts ties with Minnesota Public Radio

It's the latest change at Minnesota Public Radio.
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Counter Stories, a podcast by people of color, has announced it has cut its ties with Minnesota Public Radio, saying the environment has not been "welcoming or inclusive."

Instead, the podcast will launch independently in "the near future."

The program has been with MPR for six years, bringing voices of color to the radio to provide perspectives of communities of color and the issues that impact them. 

But, this week, amid calls to transform MPR to be more inclusive, and the impending resignation of American Public Radio's CEO, Counter Stories "has decided to end our partnership ... effective immediately," the program's website says

"Over the last six years, we have seen MPR downplay our efforts and impact, overlook our ideas, and, probably most importantly of all, had members of the newsroom dismiss and ignore our concerns and our contributions," Counter Stories says, stating MPR would make decisions about the program without input from the Counter Stories team.

The award-winning podcast says MPR hasn't been "welcoming or inclusive," and while it supports MPR's new president, it believes it's time to produce the Counter Stories podcast "on our own terms with full editorial control and decision-making power."

Counter Stories claims it offered MPR the opportunity to redefine their relationship and purchase their content, but the radio station declined. 

The podcast, which comprises a team of Anthony Galloway, Hlee Lee, Luz Maria Frias, and Don Eubanks, is seeking contributions to help it produce its own content. Donations can be made via Venmo (@Hlee-Lee-Kron) or PayPal (contact@theothermediagroup.com).

BMTN has reached out to MPR/APM for comment. 

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