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DNR warns Minnesota's water supply is limited

Some experts say our water use is taking a toll on the state's lakes, streams and wetlands. The DNR says it doesn't have the means to monitor water use across the state, so it's testing a new plan that would give local governments a greater role in conserving the supply. But officials say the biggest challenge is just informing people the supply isn't endless.
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Some experts say our water use is taking a toll on the state's lakes, streams and wetlands. The DNR says it doesn't have the means to monitor water use across the state, so it's testing a new plan that would give local governments a greater role in conserving the supply. But officials say the biggest challenge is just informing people the supply isn't endless.

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