Former Gov. Mark Dayton says he's recovering after fall

The former governor and U.S. senator says he slipped at home, causing internal bleeding
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Former Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton says he is recovering after a surgery to treat a fall he had in early August.

Dayton disclosed on Facebook Wednesday that he fell in his kitchen Aug. 4, hitting his head. His doctor sent him to Abbott Northwestern Hospital for surgery to relieve pressure from internal bleeding. 

He returned home yesterday, he said, and expects "to return to full strength and resume usual activities” after a few more months of outpatient rehabilitation. 

He said began physical therapy at the Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Center two weeks ago. 

“I was told that I made excellent progress, except for one physical therapist, who noted that I was ‘still stubborn.’” Dayton wrote. “[My] son, Eric, replied that it was a ‘pre-existing condition!"

Dayton, 73, served as governor from 2011 to 2019.  During his second term, he had to take a few trips to the hospital for health issues. In late 2018, he was hospitalized for about one month to treat complications from a back surgery.

"John Lennon wrote in one of his songs that “Life is what happens to you, while you’re busy making other plans.” No one experienced that truth more emphatically than he did. And so, once again, have I," Dayton wrote. "All things considered, I feel very fortunate to have come through this episode relatively unscathed, and I look forward to sharing new adventures with you soon."

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