Skip to main content

Let's make a deal: Will lawmakers finally agree on how to pay for road and bridges fixes?

  • Author:
  • Updated:
    Original:

Hoping lawmakers can finally come to an agreement, Gov. Mark Dayton Monday outlined two proposals to fund the state's failing roads and bridges.

Both Republicans and Democrats have said funding transportation fixes is one of their top priorities this session, but they haven't been able to agree on how to pay for it (which is the same thing that happened last year, and nothing substantial got passed).

DFL leaders had proposed raising the wholesale gas tax (among other moves), while the GOP suggested in part using existing state revenue.

"If we continue to avoid these problems, they will only get worse. It's time to begin to solve them. I urge the Legislature to work with me this session to begin to repair and improve Minnesota's transportation systems," Dayton said in a news release.

The governor's proposals come in the final week of the legislative session. Legislators have until 12:01 a.m. on May 23 to wrap things up, but they’ve said they can’t address other issues until they agree on a comprehensive transportation package.

What's in the governor's proposals

Here's a look at Dayton's proposals, which he calls a "significant compromise":

One proposal includes a 5-cent gas tax increase, while the second does not. Both proposals would increase license tab fees and use existing money from the state's general fund. (See a detailed breakdown of the plans here.)

Without gas tax hike, license tab fees would go up – and by a lot. Under Dayton's second proposal, tabs on a new $30,000 car would cost $509 in the first year, up from the $385 they are now. Over 11 years, the total fees would be $3,531, up from $2,198. (See a breakdown of the fees here.)

Both proposals would also raise the sales tax in metro-area counties by a half-cent in order to fund public transportation in the Twin Cities, the release says.

Dayton says the two proposals would each generate $600 million a year for roads and bridges and create an estimated 119,000 new jobs.

The governor presented his plans to party leaders Monday morning. House Speaker Kurt Daudt said the proposals are still not to where they can agree, but we're "optimistic that we're moving in the right direction."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqpRRTEIAsw&feature=youtu.be

Next Up

StumpysGoogleMaps

Beloved restaurant in southeastern MN to close after 40 years

A final night of celebrations is scheduled for Dec. 17.

PrinsburgGoogle

MN town shelves ordinance allowing residents to sue abortion providers

Attorney General Keith Ellison advised the town to not go forward with the ordinance.

Spring Street Tavern

Man shot dead inside Minneapolis tavern is identified

The suspect is being held on probable cause murder.

Red Hot Chili Peppers

Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Strokes to play U.S. Bank Stadium in 2023

The Strokes will provide support along with King Princess.

Mall of America exterior Tyler Vigen Wikimedia COmmons

Settlement reached between MOA, family of boy thrown from balcony

The boy suffered multiple injuries that required several surgeries.

Pixabay - police crime tape do not cross stock

Body found in burned out car near Bird Island

The Renville County Sheriff's Office is investigating.

money hundred dollar bills

Chanhassen psychologist pleads guilty to $550K billing fraud

Charles Howard Jorenby, 57, pleaded guilty to one count of healthcare fraud in U.S. District Court late last month.

police lights squad car

Charges: Coon Rapids man had 25 pounds of cocaine from Mexico

Luis Javier Avila-Lopez, 38, was arrested after law enforcement seized the cocaine earlier this year.

Screen Shot 2022-12-04 at 9.16.52 AM

Responding to Twitter release, former Minnesota GOP candidate calls for 'bullets'

It was in response to a thread on Twitter concerning the social media giant's moderation efforts regarding political issues.

Related

Group of lawmakers say they're willing to let Vikings go

Some Minnesota legislators who are opposed to setting aside taxpayer money to build a stadium say they would let the team leave the state before they change their positions. Republican Dave Thompson said "I wouldn't be making the Vikings leave. It would be the ownership of the Vikings making a decision to leave ..."

Here's how we fix America

Tired of deficits and high taxes? The answers to fixing America are pretty simple, says business contributor Glenn Dorfman...