Skip to main content

Making sense of next week's Minneapolis mayor's race

  • Author:
  • Updated:
    Original:

Candidates for Minneapolis mayor – all 35 of them – have about a week left to make their case to voters.

The Nov. 5 election is both a test for the candidates and the city's controversial and relatively untested ranked-choice voting system in which voters are directed to rank their top three choices in order. The city has used the new ranked-choice system just once before, in 2009, which was not a competitive race.

The winner of the "weird, wide-open" race could be one of two city council members, a former county commissioner – or Captain Jack Sparrow, the Associated Press notes. “It’s like mayor soup,” one bewildered Minneapolis voter tells the AP.

Only two larger U.S. cities, Oakland, Calif., and San Francisco, have used ranked-choice voting in a competitive mayoral election, the Star Tribune notes. One important takeaway from those races: second and third choices truly matter - so don't vote for just one candidate, the newspaper notes. (The Star Tribune picked its top three choices: Betsy Hodges, Don Samuels and Jackie Cherryhomes.)

In ranked-choice voting, to win the race, a candidate must get 50 percent, plus one vote. The Star Tribune explains how a series of elimination rounds is triggered if no one gets 50 percent: "Candidates with the fewest votes are eliminated by round. If a voter’s top choice is nixed, their vote is then redistributed to their next-choice candidate. It continues until a candidate garners more than 50 percent of the remaining votes."

The city has more info on how ranked-choice voting works, plus a 2-minute video and a sample-ballot exercise that endeavor to explain it.

Eight of the nearly three dozen candidates have mounted structured campaigns. There have been visible differences in the race this year, among them: fewer yard signs, fewer news conferences, more forums and debates (where not a lot has been said) and much more use of social media, MinnPost noted earlier this month.

A Star Tribune poll last month showed no clear leader in the race.

For more info on the candidates, check out MPR News and the Star Tribune for profiles.

Next Up

Disney+

Price of Disney+ is going up, unless you want ads

The ad-free version of Disney+ will increase from $7.99 per month to $10.99 per month, effective Dec. 8.

SuspectsWantedMOAShooting

Mall of America shooting suspects arrested in Chicago

The two suspects were spotted leaving a barber shop.

Flickr - minneapolis police officer close-up belt camera - Tony Webster

Walz: Increased state law enforcement presence to stay in Twin Cities

A multi-agency effort to curb crime will go on until further notice.

SuspectsWantedMOAShooting

Bloomington PD to provide update on Mall of America shooting investigation

There's unconfirmed reports the suspected gunman and an accomplice have been arrested.

Screen Shot 2022-08-11 at 3.14.27 PM

Motorcyclist found dead behind guardrail 6 hours after crash

The crash happened before sunset Wednesday, but no one called 911.

Screen Shot 2022-08-11 at 2.49.44 PM

Strike vote set for 15,000 Minnesota nurses

If the nurses walk off the job, Minnesota would be home to one of the largest nurses strikes in U.S. history.

DSC_8611

Iowa Gov. asks court to lift injunction on 'heartbeat' abortion ban

A court challenge seeks to revive Iowa's abortion ban.

zipper merge, construction

6 transportation projects in Minnesota get $100M federal funding

The projects extend to areas all across the state.

covid

Minnesota's COVID-19 update for the week ending Tuesday, August 9

The number of cases in the latest reporting period dropped compared to the previous week's update.

Screen Shot 2022-08-11 at 11.27.17 AM

Takeaways from Minneapolis' new gun violence report

The rise in violent crime in Minneapolis is showing signs of plateauing.

Related