Minneapolis 2040: How property zoning will change in your neighborhood

The comprehensive development plan was approved on Friday.
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Minneapolis 2040 land use

Minneapolis 2040 has been approved by the city council, bringing an end to single-family zoning in city neighborhoods.

The contentious plan is designed to improve access to affordable housing and reduce racial inequality in Minnesota's most populous city.

Under the plan, streets across the city will be re-designated as of Jan. 1, 2020, allowing for the construction of multi-family units on properties previously designated for single-family homes or duplexes only.

So what does it mean for you neighborhood? Well you can have a look at the gallery below that shows how neighborhoods will be designated from next year onwards.

Beneath the gallery is a legend that explains what each color-coded zone means.

LEGEND

Interior 1: Residential areas that are typically farthest from downtown and in between transit routes. New and remodeled buildings should be 1-2.5 stories, with a triplex the maximum units allowed.

Interior 2: Refers to areas developed during the streetcar era, in areas between major transit routes. These streets may have intermittent transit. New/remodeled buildings must be 1-2.5 stories with up to a triplex allowed, though larger lots can be used for larger multi-family buildings.

Interior 3: Areas closest to downtown that are between transit routes. Buildings must be 1-3 stories in height.

Corridor 3: Found on transit routes farther from downtown on narrower rights of way. The same as Interior 3 in that new/remodeled buildings must be 1-3 stories in height.

Corridor 4: On higher-frequency transit routes but still typically farther from downtown on narrower rights of way. New/remodeled buildings must be 1-4 stories in height.

Corridor 6: Found on wider-road high-frequency transit routes and near light rail and bus stations. New and remodeled buildings should be 2-6 stories.

Transit 10: On high-frequency transit routes, adjacent to light rail and bus stations, and in neighborhoods near or in downtown. New and remodeled buildings should be on moderate to large lots, and 2-10 stories in height.

Transit 15: Found in similar locations as Transit 10, except development must be between 4-15 stories in height.

Transit 20: Found in similar locations as Transit 10 and 15, but with buildings of between 6-20 stories in height.

Transit 30: On high-frequency transit routes, adjacent to light rail and bus stations, in neighborhoods near downtown, as well as being adjacent to the downtown "office core." Buildings must be 10-30 stories in height.

Core 50: The downtown district, supporting the "office core" as the center of the region's economy. Building heights must be at least 10 stories, with no maximum.

Production: Areas intended for the long term preservation of production, transportation, and job generating uses. New and remodeled buildings must be 1-10 stories.

Parks: New and remodeled buildings must be designed to support park activities (ie. shelters, food kiosks, amphitheaters).

Transportation: Applied in areas with the transportation future land use designation. New and remodeled buildings should generally conform to the districts adjacent to it.

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