Minneapolis follows Hennepin County in stopping battery collections

You can no longer recycle batteries with your garbage pickup.
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The City of Minneapolis has followed Hennepin County in stopping battery recycling amid fears over potential fire hazards.

The city announced Tuesday that it will no longer accept batteries in its recycling collection, instead saying that alkaline batteries (your AA, AAA batteries) must go in the black garbage carts.

Meanwhile, rechargeable and lithium batteries, and items such as e-cigarettes and cellphones that contain batteries must not be disposed of in garbage and recycling carts.

If you have these batteries, they must be taken to Hennepin County's drop-off locations in Bloomington and Brooklyn Park, and will also accept batteries during hazardous waste drop-off events held in the city during spring, summer and fall.

Previously, Minneapolis residents could leave alkaline batteries in plastic bags atop their recycling bin for collection.

It comes amid concerns over fires caused by lithium batteries, with the city saying they are behind increasing numbers of blazes in garbage trucks, drop-off locations and disposal facilities across the country.

The city says that you can reduce the risk of fires from lithium and rechargeable batteries by placing them in a clear plastic bag, or placing tape over the positive and negative terminals.

Last month, Hennepin County announced it would "immediately" stop battery collections at its community locations, including city and county buildings, libraries, schools, and community centers, citing the fire risk from e-cig and vaping device batteries.

You can find out more information on battery disposal here hennepin.us/batteryrecycling.

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