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Report: Minnesota's Amazon tech office is working on a secret Uber-like truck app

There's a reason Amazon is interested in the trucking business.

The developers and techies huddled in Amazon's newly opened downtown Minneapolis office are reportedly central to a new, Uber-like app for truckers.

This comes from Business Insider, which said the app – which is still a secret, and in development – will match truck drivers with companies that need shipping.

Amazon has people in Seattle and India working on this. But Minneapolis, Business Insider says, appears to be a key part of the project.

"The Minneapolis office in particular is expected to have more than 100 engineers by next year working mostly on this project, according to Business Insider's source," the story says.

Right now there are 19 open positions listed on Amazon's website.

Why do they want to do this?

Supply Chain Dive says the app could help Amazon cut its shipping costs, which have gone up because of delivery and fulfillment charges. Trucking companies earlier this year said they weren't worried about Amazon elbowing into the market, since the company is growing so fast they need every truck available, the Wall Street Journal reported.

This little snippet from the story would also seem to tie back into the in-development app: "Amazon and others want to reserve trucks on the fly, as the location of their customers in relation to the goods they purchase can be unpredictable."

Having an app that connects truckers with shippers quickly, without a middle man, certainly sounds like it'd help Amazon reach that goal.

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