Roseville food company fined after paying women less than men

They were paying men more for doing the same job as women.
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A food service company in Roseville has been ordered to pay $399,000 in back pay and interest to almost 100 female employees, after it emerged it was paying them less than its male workers.

Gender pay discrimination was found to have occurred at A'viands Food & Service Management following an investigation by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The department's evaluation resulted in the discovery of the company paying 98 women workers in its food service director-exempt positions less than male employees in similar positions made.

This underpayment had been happening since at least Dec. 31, 2011, according to a news release by the Department of Labor.

The $399,000 back pay and interest figure was agreed upon between the department and A'viands, which provides food and catering services to clients including businesses, healthcare facilities, colleges and universities, and school districts.

A'viands has also agreed to review its employee practices to see whether it has policies that have a disproportionately negative effect on pay for female workers.

"Federal contractors must ensure their pay practices do not discriminate,” a Department of Labor spokeswoman said. "The U.S. Department of Labor remains committed to holding companies with federal contracts accountable in ensuring equal employment opportunity at their facilities."

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