Sheriff: Driver fatally hits Zimmerman man who was walking in the road - Bring Me The News

Sheriff: Driver fatally hits Zimmerman man who was walking in the road

Thirty-five pedestrians have been killed by cars so far this year.
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A 59-year-old Zimmerman man died after being hit by a car Friday night.

The Sherburne County Sheriffs Office says a car driving west on the 13400 block of Fremont Avenue hit Scott Alan Zoerb, who was walking in the lane of traffic, at about 8:45 p.m. 

The driver, a 49-year-old Monticello woman, stopped at the scene and is cooperating with officials. 

It's been a deadly year on Minnesota's roads, with more people being killed this year compared to the same time last year. 

The Minnesota Department of Safety's Office of Traffic Safety said Monday 308 people have died in traffic-related incidents since Jan. 1, according to preliminary numbers.

Last year at this time, 277 people had died on Minnesota's roads. 

The number of pedestrians who've been fatally struck by cars is also up this year compared to the same time last year. Thirty-five pedestrians have been fatally struck by vehicles, including Zoerb and a recent fatality in Itasca County. In both incidents, the pedestrian was walking in the lane of traffic, according to authorities. 

At this time last year, 29 pedestrians had been killed in traffic crashes.

A breakdown of the other fatalities this year: 

  • 192 people who died this year were passengers in a vehicle (191 passengers died at this time last year)
  • 54 motorcyclists (40 at this time last year)
  • Nine bicyclists (eight at this time last year)
  • 92 people were killed in speed-related crashes (60 at this time last year)
  • 71 people who were killed were not wearing a seatbelt (54 at this time last year) – that's an increase of about 31%
  • 88 people were killed in alcohol-related crashes (89 at this time last year)
  • 22 people were killed in distracted-related crashes (30 at this time last year)

“We’re tired of seeing dangerous driving behaviors on the road and we bet you are too," Office of Traffic Safety Director Mike Hanson said in a statement. "That driver weaving in and out of traffic. That person Snapchatting behind the wheel. Those kids unbuckled in the car. 

"They are all leading to an increased number of deaths on our roads," Hanson added. "But together we can stop the needless deaths and endless pain families face when losing a loved one in a traffic crash. We ask that you commit to driving smart, not sometimes, but every time you get behind the wheel.”

In an effort to curb traffic deaths, the Office of Traffic Safety will have increased seat belt and child restraint enforcement from Nov. 16-29 and increased DWI enforcement on weekends from Nov. 25 through Dec. 31. 

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