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Some places in MN are 45 degrees warmer than they were yesterday

It's quite balmy today.

It feels quite balmy today.

Minnesota was colder than the surface of Mars over the weekend, with the low Sunday morning reaching nearly 40-below zero in Embarrass and around 30-below in the Twin Cities, according to the National Weather Service. And no, that wasn't with the wind chill.

Thankfully, the temperature across Minnesota has climbed in the past 24 hours.

In the Twin Cities, it was about 30 degrees warmer Monday morning than it was Sunday morning, while Hallock in northwestern Minnesota is seeing temperatures 49 degrees warmer.

That's quite a temperature swing, albeit it's not record-setting. The largest 24-hour temperature change in Minnesota happened in Lamberton on April 3, 1982, when it warmed up 71 degrees, WCCO meteorologist Matt Brickman tweeted.

These warmer temperatures are sticking around – at least through most of this week. The high will be in the 20s and 30s across the state, with the National Weather Service in Duluth going as far as calling this warm-up a "heat wave."

By Tuesday, some places in southern Minnesota will be 60 degrees warmer than what it was Sunday morning, meteorologist Paul Huttner wrote on MPR News' Updraft blog.

Snow for Christmas?

Snow is expected to return Wednesday, with northeastern Minnesota in line for the most – about 2-4 inches (see map below). And another round of snow is expected this weekend.

There's still some uncertainty with the winter storm that's headed for the upper Midwest Dec. 24-26, the National Weather Service says, but the agency does note that "holiday travel plans will be impacted somewhere across the Midwest this coming weekend," but where and when that will be can't be pinned down just yet.

Huttner also wrote about the Christmas storm in his weather blog, saying currently the weather models are showing different things for the Twin Cities: one says the metro area will get snow, the other is forecasting rain.

As the weekend gets closer, it'll be easier for meteorologist to narrow down what's expected, so stay tuned.

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