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St. Paul Chamber Orchestra may go part time

For five decades, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra has touted itself as the only full-time chamber orchestra in the United States -- a prestigious ensemble noted for its international touring, recordings and Grammy Awards. But in tough labor talks that seek $1.5 million in annual savings, the SPCO is reconsidering whether it can afford full-time musicians.
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For five decades, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra has touted itself as the only full-time chamber orchestra in the United States -- a prestigious ensemble noted for its international touring, recordings and Grammy Awards. But in tough labor talks that seek $1.5 million in annual savings, the SPCO is reconsidering whether it can afford full-time musicians.

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