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UND president: Retiring 'Fighting Sioux' nickname will cost $750,000

Most of that cash would go into developing a new nickname and logo, according to a letter from university president Robert Kelley to the state's budget auditor. Removing the old logos would also cost tens of thousands of dollars.
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Most of that cash would go into developing a new nickname and logo, according to a letter from university president Robert Kelley to the state's budget auditor. Removing the old logos would also cost tens of thousands of dollars.

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Governor signs law to let UND drop 'Fighting Sioux' nickname

Gov. Jack Dalrymple has signed a law overturning an attempt by some North Dakota legislators to require that the university keep the controversial nickname. The NCAA had banned the school from hosting postseason tournaments and prohibited players from wearing the uniforms during postseason play.

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North Dakota's state Senate supports the removal of UND's Fighting Sioux nickname. State law currently forces UND use the nickname, and they've faced NCAA sanctions because of it. If the new law passes, UND will have to wait three years before choosing a new nickname.

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The University of North Dakota resurrected the nickname after supporters hoping for a last-minute victory rounded up 17,000 signatures, more than enough to put the issue on the state's ballot.

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The University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux are soon to be without a nickname. North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple signed legislation today allowing UND to remove the nickname, thus opening the door to join the Big Sky Conferences and host NCAA events.

UND drops Fighting Sioux moniker

The University of North Dakota, for the third time, dropped the "Fighting Sioux" nickname Thursday. The move became official when the Board of Higher Education voted to remove the nickname and Indian head logo. Petitions are already being circulated to bring the nickname and logo back to life.

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Backers of the University of North Dakota's Fighting Sioux logo may finally have to give up the fight. Residents voted Tuesday to let the university end its use of the nickname. The NCAA has threatened sanctions against the school if its sports teams continue using the name and symbol.

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