White House: You'll still get your tax refund despite shutdown

There are fears the weeks-long government shutdown could impact Americans' IRS refunds.
Author:
Publish date:

As the impasse between the Trump administration and Congress continues, the White House has responded to fears that the ongoing government shutdown could impact tax refunds.

At a briefing on Monday, White House Office of Management and Budget acting director Russell Vought said that the IRS will continue to issue refunds to taxpayers even if the government shutdown continues into tax filing season.

As Bloomberg notes, previous shutdown contingency plans state the IRS would accept tax returns during a shutdown, but refunds would be delayed until the government was funded.

The IRS has been among the departments closed as a result of the shutdown, which is the result of a standoff between President Trump and the Democrats now in control of the U.S. House.

The House has passed a bill to end the shutdown, but the president has said he won't sign a budget that doesn't contain any funding for the U.S.-Mexico border wall.

There was expected to be enhanced pressure on both sides if the shutdown meant tax refunds would be delayed.

Sign up: Subscribe to our daily newsletters

But the latest news from the White House should alleviate this pressure and, according to The Hill, give the Trump administration extra incentive to continue holding out for border wall funding.

We took a look last month at what a federal government shutdown means for Minnesota. You can read more here.

Next Up

Andrelton Simmons / Minnesota Twins

Twins sign Andrelton Simmons to one-year deal

The former Angels shortstop is a four-time Gold Glove winner.

covid, vaccine

Minnesotans eligible for COVID shots only need to pre-register once for vaccine lottery

This is good news for people worried that they'd need to sign up every week.

police lights

2 people charged in separate Minneapolis homicides that happened hours apart

A woman is accused of stabbing a man in the chest over $60, while a man is accused of accidentally shooting a victim on the man's birthday.

House for sale

Despite pandemic, Twin Cities housing market set records in 2020

Sales were up 7.7% in 2020 compared to the year before.

Target store inside

Target unveils 'limited-edition' home, lifestyle collection with Levi Strauss

The new collection will be available in some stores and everyone online Feb. 28.

Tim Walz

Walz's $52.4 billion budget increases school spending, raises taxes on wealthy

He says the budget will help level the playing field and ensure all Minnesotans have a fair shot at economic recovery,

Screen Shot 2021-01-26 at 12.55.00 PM

Pictures from Minnesota GOP's Deadwood retreat show no masks, no distancing

The pictures were shared in Chair Jennifer Carnahan's latest email newsletter.

Alexus Norberg

Search for girl, 14, missing from St. Cloud

The teen left her home without her parents' permission.

coronavirus, covid-19

Here is Minnesota's COVID-19 update for Tuesday, January 26

The health departments provided new data daily at 11 a.m.

Related

MN student tried to access Trump tax records before 2016 election

The 22-year-old has pleaded guilty to federal crimes.

T-Mobile customers to get refund checks over unwanted charges

The carrier has been ordered to refund customers over "mobile cramming."

The federal government shutdown is over, for 3 weeks at least

A deal has been struck between President Trump and Congress.

Screen Shot 2019-04-15 at 4.39.40 PM

What did President Trump say during his Minnesota visit?

The president spent a couple of hours in Burnsville this afternoon.

CenterPoint's $47M refund errors saw thousands hit with fees

The gas and electricity provider blundered when trying to refund customers who were overcharged.

While the world watched Comey, U.S. House voted to strip these finance rules

The vote could have implications for American consumers.

Screen Shot 2019-04-30 at 1.56.16 PM

Minnesota Teacher of the Year snubs White House visit

Kelly Holstine was one of two teachers to boycott the meeting with the president on political grounds.