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And the University of North Dakota's new nickname is...

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After three years without a mascot, the University of North Dakota finally has a new nickname: the Fighting Hawks.

The university released the results of the contest – and the winning name – on Wednesday morning, less than two days after final voting ended.

The results show 27,378 people voted, and that the contest wasn't really close at all – the Fighting Hawks' 15,670 votes beat the Sundogs' tally by nearly 4,000 votes.

University officials say the new moniker will take seven months to fully implement, and that there are still some details to work out (like logo design, for instance).

Voting started with five nicknames – Fighting Hawks, Nodaks, North Stars, Roughriders, and Sundogs – and was whittled down to two, the Fighting Hawks and Roughriders, for a final runoff vote this month.

The online vote came after a long (and sometimes controversial) fight to select UND's mascot, which had been "Fighting Sioux" until the school abandoned it in 2012 over racial insensitivity issues.

There was fierce opposition from some people toward the five nicknames the university put to a vote, with a vocal group of UND fans believing that the school should stick with the "no nickname" option.

Those eligible to vote in the online contest were students, alumni, donors, faculty, and season ticket holders to UND's athletic events.

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