National Weather Service: 'Big changes ahead' after gorgeous start to the week in Minnesota

Looks like the bottom will fall out later this week.
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The National Weather Service is closely monitoring what they're calling a "powerful storm system" that is expected to impact the Plains and Upper Midwest later this week. 

The word "snow" is being tossed around, but as the weather service says, take everything with a grain of salt at this point. 

"Accumulating snow is possible across the Plains and western Minnesota late this week and this weekend. However, some snowflakes are likely as far east as Wisconsin by Friday night," says the National Weather Service in the Twin Cities, noting that it "is impossible to forecast accurate amounts this far out."

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Along with all the talk you'll hear about snow chances this week you'll also get plenty of chatter about the potential for much colder air. 

Check out this graphic from the weather service, which calls for temps to soar to around 70 degrees in the Twin Cities Tuesday-Wednesday and then nosedive into the 40s Friday with temps over the weekend possibly hanging out in the upper 30s. The normal for this time of year is 60-62 degrees. 

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If a snowstorm does impact North Dakota later this week, it could be strikingly similar to what happened around the same time last year when a storm dumped upwards of a foot of snow in eastern North Dakota, including an eye-popping 17 inches in Finley, a small town 40 miles from the Minnesota border.

“To get a foot of snow in October is relatively rare, but it does happen every half-dozen years,” NWS meteorologist Greg Gust told Forum News Service after last year's Oct. 10 storm.

That storm scraped northwest Minnesota, bringing 2-5 inches of snow to areas like Thief River Falls and Warroad. 

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We'll keep tabs on what the weather service is saying the rest of the week and keep you posted with updates to the Weather MN blog

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