1 in 10 Minn. households lacks access to healthy food

It may come as a surprise to some in agriculture-rich Minnesota, but the number of people who have a tough time affording adequate healthy food is stuck at an all-time high, MPR reports. A U.S. Department of Agriculture report says about one in 10 Minnesota households does not get enough food for a healthy lifestyle.
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One in 10 households in Minnesota are not getting the healthy food they need, MPR reports.

That striking statistic is part of a new U.S. Department of Agriculture report. Here's another: 524,000 Minnesotans are now on food stamps. That's more than the combined populations of Minneapolis and Duluth, MPR notes.

Minnesota fares better than the national average of 14.9 percent of households that struggle to put nourishing food on the table. But Minnesota's 10.2 rate appears to be stuck and not decreasing.

MPR talked to Christine Pulver, who runs Keystone Community Services. She said the food bank there is nearing the top of what it is capable of giving.

Another report from last month put the number of hungry Minnesotans higher, finding about 13 percent of people in the state had said they struggled at least once in the past 12 months to buy the food their families needed. That's based on findings from Gallup, noted Hunger Solutions Minnesota, a hunger relief organization.

Want to learn more or help fight hunger in the state? Hunger Free Minnesota, is another coalition dedicated to the issue.

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