1 in 100 million: Brooklyn Park couple welcomes identical triplets

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Brooklyn, Zoey and Mackenzie Hanson are a rarity in the medical world.

The 5-month-old identical triplets were conceived without fertility treatments, an occurrence that some say has odds of 1 in 100 million, FOX 9 reports.

The girls, born 10 weeks early and weighing less than 3 pounds each, spent 6 weeks in the hospital before parents Adam and Kayla Hanson were able to bring them home to Brooklyn Park.

Now, the next miracle will be juggling the routines of three newborns.

"I try to feed all three at the same time," Kayla Hanson told FOX 9. "You do two at once, and when one wants a break, you switch and keep going back and lots of crying in between there."

The Hansons said in all, it's going pretty well. FOX 9 also has a photo slideshow.

Last month, another set of naturally-conceived identical triplet girls were born in northern California.

“Identical triplets are anywhere from one-in-a-million and one-in-a hundred million,” Dr. William M. Gilbert, medical director of Sutter Women’s Services and founder of Moms of Multiples Center in Sacramento, told the Sacramento Bee. “It is so rare that it is hard to calculate how frequently they occur.”

In 2004, CBS News profiled a somewhat more famous set of identical triplet boys born in Chicago nearly 70 years ago, well before fertility drugs existed.
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