The blue-green algae that can kill dogs has popped up in an Edina lake - Bring Me The News

The blue-green algae that can kill dogs has popped up in an Edina lake

A lake in Edina is now a public health hazard because of blue-green algae.
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Lake Cornelia

Lake Cornelia

People are being warned not to use a lake in the Twin Cities suburb of Edina, after algae levels reached a point where toxins in the water present a “public health risk.”

High levels of blue-green algae have been reported in Lake Cornelia, which brings with it high levels of “microcystin” – a toxin produced by the freshwater bacteria that can be harmful to human health and can even kill pets.

Part of the lake shore is next to Rosland Park, south of Highway 62.

The City of Edina, in a press release issued Saturday, said it is “urging residents to stay away from the water” while follow-up tests are conducted, and water officials come up with a strategy for solving the problem.

What exactly is blue-green algae?

Blue green algae isn’t actually an algae, but a freshwater bacteria called cyanobacteria. With foul-smelling blooms that resemble pea soup, it generally presents during warm weather when the water is stagnant and rich in nutrients.

Exposure to the toxins can be harmful to liver and kidney functions, with symptoms of poisoning including jaundice, shock, abdominal pain, weakness, nausea, vomiting, severe thirst and a rapid pulse.

Pets are more at risk. Blooms reported in Minnesota back in springresulted in the death of several dogs.

“The City is working with Nine Mile Creek Watershed District and an engineering consultant to strategize solutions for the problem,” said Edina water resources coordinator Jessica Vanderwerff Wilson.

The presence of algae has presented even though the lake is treated twice a year by restoration companies, the city says.

The city will hold a meeting with residents to discuss solutions in November.

Related

Warm weather could contribute to growth of blue-green algae on Minn. lakes

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency says to keep a lookout for blue-green algae on lakes because it comes with health risks. The toxic algae -- which has a pungent smell, and has a fluorescent green hue or could be pink or blue -- can cause rashes, nausea or vomiting both in humans, and could be potentially be fatal to pets.

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