2 national groups to sue to protect wolf

The Humane Society of the United States and The Fund for Animals signaled Monday that they will file suit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in an effort to return the Great Lakes wolf to the endangered species list. The groups ask that Wisconsin and Minnesota halt wolf hunts. The Wisconsin has already begun. Meanwhile two other groups are appealing to the Minnesota Supreme Court to stop the hunt in Minnesota, which begins Nov. 3.
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The Humane Society of the United States and The Fund for Animals signaled Monday that they will file suit against the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in an effort to return the Great Lakes wolf to the endangered species list, the Star Tribune reports. The groups ask that Wisconsin and Minnesota halt wolf hunts.

The Wisconsin hunt began Monday and up to 1,160 state licensed hunters and trappers will take part until the season ends Feb. 28, 2013, Northland's Newscenter reported. A limit of 201 wolves can be killed in Wisconsin, where there are more than 850 of the animals.

Meanwhile, two other groups – The Center for Biological Diversity and Howling for Wolves – are appealing to the Minnesota Supreme Court to stop the hunt in Minnesota, which begins Nov. 3, the Associated Press reports.

The hunts mark a new era for wolf management in the Midwest, MPR reports. Hunt proponents argue they are the result of a successful effort to protect the wolf under the Endangered Species Act, while critics say wolves should never be hunted, MPR reports.

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Wisconsin opens wolf hunt

Wisconsin's first hunting season since the gray wolf came off the endangered species list begins Monday. Hunters and trappers will be allowed to take 201 wolves by the end of February, although nearly half of those are set aside for tribal members. Unlike their Minnesota counterparts (whose season begins Nov. 3rd), Wisconsinites will be able to hunt at night and use dogs.

Billboards protest upcoming wolf hunt

A group called Howling for Wolves is paying for billboards around the Twin Cities to oppose the new wolf hunting and trapping seasons this fall, WCCO reports. The wolf was removed from the endangered species list last January and the state legislature told the DNR to go ahead with the hunt.

Wolf hunting opponents rally in Duluth

Two groups against the upcoming wolf hunt in Minnesota, Duluth-based Northwoods Wolf Alliance and Twin Cities-based Howling for Wolves, organized an event dubbed the "Wolf Walk" in Duluth on Saturday, the WDIO reports. Minnesota's first wolf hunt in nearly 40 years is set to begin on Nov. 3rd.

Minn. Court of Appeals allows wolf hunt to proceed

The Minnesota Court of Appeals will not block Minnesota's wolf hunt scheduled for Nov. 3. The three-judge panel said The Center for Biological Diversity and Howling for Wolves failed to show that the season would cause irreparable harm. About 6,000 hunters will receive permits for the first ever organized wolf hunt in the state. Experts say wolves are much smarter than deer or ducks and it's unlikely Minnesota will reach their target harvest of 400 wolves.

Critics begin ad campaign in hopes of stopping wolf hunt

With the gray wolf now off the endangered species list, Minnesota is preparing a fall hunting season that would reduce the state's 3,000 or so wolves by 400. A group opposed to the hunt -- Howling for Wolves -- is taking to the airwaves to try to stop the hunt. Ojibwe bands are also fighting against a wolf hunting season.

Wolf hunt opponents petition to stop season

A group opposed to the hunting and trapping of gray wolves is petitioning the Department of Natural Resources to cancel this year's planned wolf hunt in Minnesota. Howling for Wolves also has a billboard campaign in the Twin Cities. The group is rallying at the DNR headquarters in St. Paul on Thursday.

Protesters call on Dayton to end wolf hunting

The advocacy group Howling for Wolves gathered on a Duluth street corner Saturday to call on Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton to end wolf hunting in the state. One protester said they are "getting the cold shoulder from the governor and the DNR."

Over 23,000 apply for state's first wolf hunt

A significant number of people showed interest in Minnesota's first-ever wolf hunt. More than 23,000 applied for permits but only 6,000 will be awarded. Opponents rallied in downtown Duluth Friday. Wolf advocates say Governor Dayton has the authority to stop the hunt on Nov. 3.