3 years since killings at Accent Signage, Minnesota's deadliest workplace shooting

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Sunday marked three years since Andrew Engeldinger walked into Accent Signage Systems, Inc., in Minneapolis and took the lives of six innocent people.

On Sept. 27, 2012, Engeldinger was fired from his job at the company and returned shortly thereafter, opening fire in the office and killing five of his former co-workers as well as a UPS driver. Two other people were injured.

Engeldinger ultimately turned the gun on himself and took his own life.

It was Minnesota's most violent workplace shooting, and continues to impact the lives of the survivors and the family members of those who died.

One of those survivors, John Souter, is now hoping to make some real changes in how the country deals with such acts of violence – and the victims they leave behind.

In an interview with MPR News on Friday, the Accent Signage director of operations said the 1984 Victims of Crime Act has lost key protections for people who are victimized in such incidents as the one that left him wounded and scarred.

Specifically, it's a compensation fund for people who are in need of medical care and other services after acts of violence but who can't cover the costs themselves.

MPR says Suitor is seeking to publish an op-ed piece about his concerns, and describes him as an advocate for federal legislation that helps crime victims.

He also become an advocate for tighter gun control laws; just six months after the shooting, he gave an impassioned speech in Minnetonka calling on lawmakers to support universal background checks for gun buyers, among other measures, Finance & Commerce reported.

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Accent Signage vows to press on after workplace shooting

Officials at Accent Signage in Minneapolis vowed Monday that the company will continue operations despite the Sept. 27 shooting that left seven dead and two wounded. "Their loss has taken a tremendous toll on our company and had an unimaginable impact on our families," said Shereen Rahamim, wife of the slain owner.