3M settles suit with state of Minnesota, agrees to pay $850M

They were sued by attorney general Lori Swanson over PFC contamination in the East Metro.
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Fortune 500 giant 3M has agreed a $850 million settlement with the state of Minnesota.

The Maplewood-based firm was sued by Attorney General Lori Swanson, who accused it of contaminating large areas of the East Twin Cities Metro with petrofluorochemicals (PFCs) knowing it was harmful to health, and then attempting to mask it.

Jury selection for a trial was due to get underway on Tuesday but was canceled in the morning, suggesting an agreement had been reached.

Related:

– What you need to know about the 3M-Minnesota trial

According to a statement, 3M has agreed to provide a $850 million grant to the state to create a "3M Grant for Water Quality and Sustainability Fund."

It will be used for water sustainability projects in the East Metro region, an area where Swanson alleged 3M contaminated water supplies, causing PFCs to be consumed by 67,000 residents.

As well as improving groundwater quality, the fund will also be used for "habitat and recreation improvements, such as fishing piers, trails and open space preservation."

Swanson, who sued 3M for $5 billion, is expected to make a statement later on Tuesday afternoon.

You can find background on the case here.

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