4th of July: Here's (almost) everything you should know

Author:
Updated:
Original:

Everything you need to know (or at least most of it) for planning your Fourth of July holiday weekend celebration.

You can read each of these sections in about 15 seconds – so it'll be quick!

Where to watch fireworks

Looking for a new spot to watch the fireworks?

Explore Minnesota has a list of Fourth of July fireworks celebrations around Minnesota. As does the Star Tribune, but their list focuses on the Twin Cities area specifically, and also includes a map.

The weather should be decent

By fireworks time on the Fourth of July, the weather should be clear, dry and comfortable for Minnesotans.

Wherever you are, expect temps in the mid-60s to upper 70s around 10 p.m. Saturday. Storms could then roll in overnight.

Click here for a closer look at forecasts around the state.

The traffic ... might be tougher

The July 4 holiday is expected to be the busiest for travel in the past eight years, and Minnesotans may experience a longer wait on the roads due to ongoing construction projects around the state.

Sunday afternoon traffic should be the worst; expect a slow drive getting back home.

Click here to see a list of closures you'll want to know about.

Fireworks are dangerous

When celebrating at home with some fireworks, be careful.

The state fire marshal says last year 71 people went to the hospital for fireworks injuries. 15 of them were under 10 years old.

The fire marshal says be especially cautious of sparklers, which burn at more than 1,200 degrees and are the most common culprit of fireworks injuries.

Check out some guidelines published by the West Central Tribune.

They're also bad for the air

According to the NOAA, researchers found levels of fine particles in the air (tiny bits that can get into your lungs) increase by 42 percent on the night of the Fourth of July.

People who might be sensitive to that – such as those dealing with asthma – are encouraged to watch fireworks upwind, or from as far away as possible.

Be mindful of veterans

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs estimates 11-20 percent of veterans who served in the Middle East suffer from PTSD, CNN reports. Loud noises, such as fireworks or gunfire, can trigger a reaction.

The Facebook group Military with PTSD helps send out signs that can be put outside a home, letting neighbors know a warning would be appreciated before any fireworks are set off nearby.

Which fireworks are legal?

WCCO sums it up easily: "If it flies or explodes, it's illegal." Click here to read their "Dos and dont's" guide.

Next Up

leech lake band of ojibwe sign

11,760 acres of land wrongly taken from Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe will be returned

The Senate and now the House have passed a bill that effectively returns the land. It's now headed for the president's signature.

Karl-Anthony Towns

Timberwolves release first half of 2020-21 regular season schedule

The second half of the schedule will be announced at a later date.

reindeer como zoo

Watch live: Como Zoo's live reindeer cam is back for December

The live feed will run 24/7 allowing you to keep an eye on Santa's antlered helpers.

sleeping

Three simple ways to boost your immune health heading into winter

Eating right is one thing, but there are other ways to stay healthy as the days shorten.

Taylor Rogers

Why Twins fans shouldn't give up on Taylor Rogers

The Twins closer struggled in 2020 but could rebound next season.

Co. Rd. 2 crash, Wakefield Twp.

Teen driver leaves road, crashes into three trees

Fortunately, the 16-year-old was not injured.

mndot deer  tunnel 1

Minnesota is getting its first highway crossing for animals

This will provide a safe way for animals to cross the street, and hopefully limit deer-vehicle collisions.

Screen Shot 2020-12-04 at 11.00.30 AM

Money Gal Coaching: Habits of a millionaire, just in time for the holidays?

Kelly Blodgett started Money Gal Coaching after paying down nearly $50K in debt in 18 months.

Mayo Belle Plaine

Mayo temporarily closes 5 clinics in southern MN amid COVID surge

The Mayo is reallocating staff to other sites as it deals with the COVID outbreak.

Related