5 things to know about the new 'travel ban' that goes into effect Thursday - Bring Me The News

5 things to know about the new 'travel ban' that goes into effect Thursday

The executive order kicks in Thursday – here's a rundown of what to expect.
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A modified version of the White House’s executive order instituting a "travel ban," as the president and others have called it, is set to go into effect Thursday.

The order has been tweaked and changed as it's gone through the court system over the months. Here are five things to know about the version that's about to become a reality.

When it starts

The U.S. Supreme Court Monday said it would review the travel ban executive order, and potentially take up the case later this year. For now, while the justices go over the case, they'll allow a limited version of it to go into effect. (Previously, lower courts had put it on hold.)

This modified version is expected to go into effect at 7 p.m. central time, Bloomberg reports.

It affects foreign nationals from 6 countries

Foreign nationals from six countries with significant Muslim populations are barred from coming to the United States for the next 90 days. Those six countries are: Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. (Iraq was included in the original executive order, but was taken off in March after its government lobbied for an exemption, CNN reported.)

Somalia of course is of particular note for Minnesota, since the state has one of the largest Somali populations in the country.

But this order doesn't outright ban everyone – there are exceptions.

A 'bona fide relationship' gets you in

It isn’t a complete ban. Anyone who can make “a credible claim of a bona fide relationship” with someone or something in the U.S. is exempt, the Supreme Court said in its opinion. What that means is left a little open, but the court gave a few examples.

A student from one of those six countries who has already been admitted to an American university would still be able to come over. As would someone who has a close relative, such as a spouse or in-law.

Refugees from all countries are blocked

The refugee portion is a little different. Refugees from any country are barred from coming to America for the next 120 days. The only exceptions would be similar to above – if they have a close familial relation in the U.S. and want to come visit or live with that person.

"But when it comes to refugees who lack any such connection to the United States, for the reasons we have set out, the balance tips in favor of the government’s compelling need to provide for the nation’s security," the opinion says.

Anyone who's already been admitted is good

Any foreign national from those six countries listed above will be let in if they've already gotten a visa, ABC News reports. Same goes for any refugee who was set to be brought over before July 6.

Once the executive order goes into effect, anyone who applies to come to the U.S. will have to prove they have that “credible claim of a bona fide relationship.”

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