A bill banning gun-shaped phone cases passed the Senate 60-0 - Bring Me The News

A bill banning gun-shaped phone cases passed the Senate 60-0

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Those gun-shaped cellphone cases that caused an uproar last year could soon be illegal in Minnesota.

Last summer, Minnesota lawmakers said they wanted gun-shaped phone cases banned, calling them "incredibly dangerous."

And Wednesday, the Senate voted 60-0 to approve a bill that would prohibit "the possession, manufacture, or sale of cellular telephone cases resembling a firearm."

https://twitter.com/MNSeninfo/status/727957374665826304

Advocates of the ban say that these phone cases are a safety risk, because they could be mistaken for a real firearm.

The bill has the support of the Minnesota Chiefs of Police Association, according to the office of Senate Majority Leader Tom Bakk, and police departments from around the country have asked people not to buy them.

https://twitter.com/UWMadisonPolice/status/616999434778484736

Violators could receive a petty misdemeanor charge and a fine up to $300, WCCO reported.

It still needs to be passed by the House

Just because the Senate gave the proposal an overwhelming thumbs-up, doesn't mean it's a law yet.

The House has to pass the exact same bill, and they have not taken action on the bill since back in April, according to the Minnesota State Legislature website.

However, this bill does have bipartisan support and was not controversial when it was heard in either the House or Senate commerce committees, Bakk's office said.

If it is passed by the House, it will then be up to Gov. Mark Dayton to sign the bill, or veto it.

The bill does not address guns that are designed to look like cellphones.

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