A daughter explains why she wrote 'evil does in fact die' in her father's obituary - Bring Me The News

A daughter explains why she wrote 'evil does in fact die' in her father's obituary

Charping "did not contribute to society or serve his community and he possessed no redeeming qualities besides quick whited [sic] sarcasm."
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The obituary for 75-year-old Texas man Leslie Ray Charping is being described as "brutal." It paints Charping as a terrible father who drank too much, battled mental illness, and lived a life that "served no other obvious purpose" than to abuse his family, hunt, and fish.

Why so harsh? Well turns out his daughter wrote it, and she offers an explanation.

KHOU is one of the outlets that has a copy of the full obituary (which has since been taken down from Carnes Funeral Home).

"Leslie Ray 'Popeye' Charping was born in Galveston on November 20, 1942 and passed away January 30, 2017, which was 29 years longer than expected and much longer than he deserved," it begins.

From there it criticizes him for drinking too much, using drugs, being a bad parent, sleeping around, "being generally offensive," and joining the military simply to avoid criminal charges.

Charping "did not contribute to society or serve his community and he possessed no redeeming qualities besides quick whited [sic] sarcasm which was amusing during his sober days," it says, later adding: "Leslie's passing proves that evil does in fact die and hopefully marks a time of healing and safety for all."

His daughter released a statement to ABC 13, saying she loved her father, but wanted to be honest. And thought he would appreciate the bluntness.

"I apologize to anyone that my father hurt and I felt it would have been offensive to portray him as anything other than who he was," she said. "This obituary was intended to help bring closure because not talking about domestic violence doesn't make it go away!"

Read her full explanation here.

If you or someone you know needs help or is facing domestic violence, here’s where to find a program near you. You can also call a confidential domestic violence hotline like Minnesota DayOne at (866) 223-1111.

If you’re looking to help others, you can start by getting involved in public policy surrounding domestic violence. Here are some resources for that.

This story is part of our Best of the Web section – which is just interesting stuff we find online and want to share with you.

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