A decade after tragedy, Minnesota woman preaches courage

Jan Jenkins knows tragedy. Her son disappeared a decade ago after a night of drinking in Minneapolis. WCCO takes a look at how her work trying to inspire others has helped her deal with her own pain.
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Jan Jenkins knows tragedy. Her son disappeared a decade ago after a night of drinking in Minneapolis. WCCO takes a look at how her work trying to inspire others has helped her deal with her own pain.

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