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A smaller crop of farming subsidies

Federal funding may soon drop for Minnesota farmers. Lawmakers in Washington are close to a deal that would reduce agricultural subsidies nationwide. The proposal would save $23 billion dollars over 10 years.
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Federal funding may soon drop for Minnesota farmers. Lawmakers in Washington are close to a deal that would reduce agricultural subsidies nationwide. The proposal would save $23 billion dollars over 10 years.

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