Advising people on how to kill themselves remains illegal in MN

The U.S. Supreme Court let our assisted suicide law stand.
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America's highest court refused to hear a case challenging Minnesota's assisted suicide law Monday. 

A group called Final Exit Network has argued the law, which makes it illegal to assist a suicide either physically or with verbal instruction, violates the First Amendment protection of free speech.

But the group's appeal of their 2015 conviction was on Monday's list of cases the U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear. That means Minnesota's law and the conviction both stand.

Final Exit Network insists that's not the end of it, though. They said in a Facebook post: "We will soon file a petition in federal court for a judgment declaring the Minnesota statute unconstitutional, voiding the conviction, and enjoining the State of Minnesota from enforcing its anti-free speech provision."

The Minnesota case

Final Exit Network, which is based in Georgia, says it provides education to people about end of life choices and "a compassionate presence to those ... who have chosen to end their suffering." 

In 2012 prosecutors in Dakota County said "exit guides" who traveled to the home of an Apple Valley woman to help her end her life had violated Minnesota's law against assisting suicides.

Final Exit Network argued they only provided information, but a jury convicted the group. They were fined $30,000 and ordered to pay the funeral expenses of Doreen Dunn, 57, who had suffered from chronic pain before her suicide.

Last December Minnesota's Court of Appeals upheld the conviction of Final Exit Network.

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