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Aerial yoga turns practice on its head

Aerial yoga is putting a whole new spin on the traditional exercise. WCCO reports on a practice that is easier on the spine than floor-bound workouts, instructors say. Students get up off the mat using heavy fabric looped and secured to the ceiling.
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Aerial yoga offers local students a whole new approach to the exercise that instructors say may be easier on the spine, WCCO says. And students say it makes them feel like kids again.

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