After floods, Duluth hoping for July 4 tourism jolt

Duluth is desperately hoping the Fourth of July holiday will offer a boost to its hobbled tourism industry, which took a $3 million hit after recent flooding. A new ad blitz is planned to lure visitors back. The region got more bad news with the announcement that popular Jay Cooke State Park likely will be closed for the season. Meanwhile, the United Way is leading an effort to raise money for homeowners who say it'll be a struggle to rebuild.
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Two weeks after heavy rains flooded Duluth, closed a major state park and caused tens of millions of dollars in damage, locals are hoping for a big boost from the Independence Day holiday, MPR reports.

The city estimates the flooding cost its tourism industry at least $3 million, KARE 11 said.

The popular Jay Cooke State Park on the St. Louis River, about 20 miles southwest of Duluth, probably will be closed for the remainder of the summer in the wake of flood-related washouts along Minnesota Highway 210, the Duluth News Tribune reports.

Meanwhile, the tax man is showing some mercy for businesses hobbled by flood damage. Minnesota’s tax collectors are waiving deadlines for some businesses, the Associated Press says.

And the United Way is helping to spearhead a fundraising effort to raise as much as $1 million for private property owners, Northland's Newscenter reports.

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