Emotional Senser says she didn't think she hit a person

Amy Senser choked up several times while testifying in her own defense Monday. She told jurors that she thought she hit a construction barrel or pothole. Under cross-examination, Senser denied that she was trying to hide evidence when she deleted dozens of text messages from her phone.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

An emotional Amy Senser took the stand Monday and told jurors that she didn't realize she had hit a person, instead saying she thought she'd hit a pothole, the Associated Press reports.

Senser added that she'd only had part of a glass of wine that evening.

Under questioning from prosecutor Deborah Russell, Senser said she was not trying to hide evidence when she deleted dozens of text messages from her phone or when she donated the clothes she wore that night to Goodwill.

The trial began Monday with a driving safety expert testifying that Senser may have seen the flashing lights of th stalled car, but would've had trouble reacting given the lack of street lighting and the clutter of construction signs.

As the trial entered its second week, the Pioneer Press astutely pointed out that the trial has included very little exploration of the victim, Anousone Phanthavong.

The Star Tribune spoke with legal observers who believe the case is Senser's to lose.

The first week of the trial was filled with dramatic testimony from Joe Senserhis daughters, and a state patrol reconstructionist.

The week ended when Joe Senser confronted media photographers in the lobby of the Hennepin County Government Center, though, he later told Kare11 in an email that he did it to protect his daughter from media scrutiny.

Senser, 45, is charged in connection with the hit-and-run that killed Phanthavong last August. She faces three counts of criminal vehicular homicide. Her husband Joe is a former Minnesota Viking and a successful local business owner.

Next Up

Related

Jury note emerges in Senser's hit-and-run case

Before Amy Senser's guilty verdicts were delivered in court last week, jurors asked the judge to read a note in court. It said, "We believe, she believed she hit a car or a vehicle and not a person." The note was entered into the case docket, but not read out loud.

Amy Senser's hit-and-run case goes to the jury

Deliberations are underway in her criminal vehicular homicide trial. The defense rested its case Tuesday morning and each side delivered their closing arguments. Twelve men and women will now decide whether Amy Senser knew she hit a person on a Minneapolis freeway exist ramp last August. The jury will be sequestered until a verdict is reached.

Deliberations resume in Amy Senser case

Jurors recessed Tuesday night after more than four hours of deliberating without reaching a verdict in Amy Senser's vehicular homicide case. The jury resumed deliberations Wednesday morning. The twelve men and women are deciding whether the wife of former Viking Joe Senser knew she hit a person on a Minneapolis freeway exist ramp last August. The jurors are being sequestered until they reach a verdict.

Defense rests in Amy Senser hit-and-run trial, closing arguments to follow

Deliberations could begin Tuesday afternoon and jurors will be sequestered until they reach a verdict. A retired State Patrol investigator was the last witness to testify Tuesday morning in Sener's criminal vehicular homicide trial. She is charged with three counts in the death of Anousone Phanthavong. The Roseville man was standing by his car on a freeway exit ramp in Minneapolis last August when he was struck and killed.

Evidence in Senser's hit-and-run case made public

The judge has released photos and hundreds of text messages shown to jurors during the trial that ended last Thursday. Amy Senser was convicted on two counts of criminal vehicular homicide for the accident that killed Anousone Phanthavong last August. Senser will be sentenced on July 9.

Joe Senser: Amy said she'd hit a construction cone

Former Vikings star Joe Senser testified at his wife's vehicular homicide trial Wednesday, saying Amy Senser told him she'd hit a construction cone or barrel. After seeing news reports that a man was struck and killed on an I-94 exit ramp, Joe Sener says his wife told him she had used that ramp but was not involved in the incident. Earlier, an expert testified that 45 messages were deleted from Amy Senser's phone the day after the hit-and-run.