An '-apolis' a day keeps the doctor away? Minneapolis ranked healthiest city

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Of the tens of thousands of cities in the United States, the healthiest one is apparently in Minnesota.

Livability ranked Minneapolis as the healthiest city in the U.S., beating out competitors such as Honolulu, Miami and Fort Collins, Colorado.

Cambridge, Massachusetts, came in No. 2. And Madison, Wisconsin, came in third.

So why Minneapolis?

Livability highlighted a few frequently mentioned pros, plus some that are less-talked-about.

There's the parks system, and how it plays into Minneapolitans' proclivity for exercise and fitness.

But Livability takes it a step further, noting there are a high ratio of doctors, dentists and mental health providers in the city; and it sports an insured rate of about 90 percent. On top of that, the EPA says the city's air and water are pretty clean, Livability writes.

It's not uncommon for the Twin Cities to be toward the top of livability, or other health and wellness indexes.

The metro has been the first- or second-best in terms of fitness for four years now, and consistently scores well for things like family travel, opportunities available for young people, and even memorable bathrooms.

Does an apple a day do anything?

And on a semi-related note, about that phrase "An apple a day keeps the doctor away":

A recent study by the University of Michigan actually found an apple a day didn't affect trips to the doctor; they were about the same frequency as non-apple eaters, Today reported.

However, those who ate about an apple a day did require fewer prescription drugs.

That said, it might not be the cause of less meds. People who eat an apple a day may tend to make healthier choices in general, affecting how often they need prescription drugs, Today notes.

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