Another Twin Cities golf course plans to close

Both Minneapolis and St. Paul will be losing courses
Author:
Updated:
Original:

Your chances to tee off at Minneapolis' Hiawatha Golf Course are winding down. 

The city's Park Board has been wrestling with how to handle drainage problems that sometimes leave the course flooded and on Wednesday evening the board voted to pull the plug on the 18-hole course, the Star Tribune reports

Water problems at Hiawatha

Partly to keep the golf course from getting soggy in that waterlogged area, Minneapolis has been pumping millions of gallons of water into Lake Hiawatha. 242 million a year, to be exact. One problem: that's nearly seven times more water than its permit from the DNR allows it to pump. 

This was discovered by the state after some bigger-than-usual flooding a couple years ago. 

Last month an analysis done for the Park & Recreation Board concluded there were two options: keep doing what they've been doing and ask permission for it ... or cut back on the pumping and shut down the golf course. Board members went with the second option but the course will stay open through the 2019 season.

Might still be some golf there

The plan approved Wednesday means the park will look very different in a few years, with an open channel of water flowing into Lake Hiawatha. 

Park Board member Steffanie Musich noted in a Facebook post Wednesday night that a Community Advisory Committee will be formed to help plan the park's future and said there could still be golf at Hiawatha in some form. 

Hillcrest closing in St. Paul

The decision to close Hiawatha comes just a few weeks after it was revealed that this is the final season for Hillcrest Golf Club in St. Paul.

Their situations are very different, since Hiawatha is a public course and Hillcrest is a 96-year-old private club.

But the closings add to the perception that fewer people are playing golf these days. 

The Pioneer Press says the numbers show at least 37 golf courses have closed in Minnesota since 2003, maybe because younger people find the sport too expensive and time consuming.

There are still 386 courses listed in the Minnesota Golf Association's directory

Next Up

Related