Appeals court overturns farmer's conviction on deer baiting - Bring Me The News

Appeals court overturns farmer's conviction on deer baiting

A Hibbing man was charged with illegal baiting after he tossed unused vegetables near his deer stand on his property. An appeals court ruled that allowing the charges to stand could make it impossible for farmers to hunt on their own land.
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A Hibbing man was charged with illegal baiting after he tossed unused vegetables near his deer stand on his property. An appeals court ruled that allowing the charges to stand could make it impossible for farmers to hunt on their own land.

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