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As temperatures soar, officials release tips on handling the extreme heat

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With temperatures in the upper 80s and 90s, and some heat indexes reaching 100 today, Minneapolis City officials released tips on how to handle the heat that is useful for anyone.

Seniors, small children and people with physical disabilities are the most vulnerable to heat-related illness, but everyone should take steps to stay safe in extreme heat.

• Drink more fluids.

• Never leave any person or animals in a closed, parked vehicle.

• Wear lightweight, loose-fitted clothing.

• Check on your neighbors who may be at risk.

• Stay indoors if you can.

• Don’t rely on an electric fan.

Officials are also encouraging people to keep pets inside and out of the direct sun and warn to never leave your pet unattended in a parked car for any period of time.

The Minneapolis Health Department works closely with other local jurisdictions and the Minnesota Department of Health to help people prepare for extreme heat events.

For more tips on extreme heat you can visit the Health Department's page here.

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