Austin man with a cause hopes to grace cover of national magazine

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Kelly Nesvold, a chiropractor who lives in Austin, Minnesota, hopes you'll see him on the cover of Runner's World magazine some day.

But personal glory has nothing to do with it.

Nesvold is participating in the Runner's World Cover Search, a national contest that will see "the two most awesome runners in America" – one man and one woman – on the cover of the publication's December 2015 issue.

The criteria? The winners must be "fit, athletic, and dedicated," and perhaps most importantly, their accomplishments must inspire others "to be the best they can be, too."

And Nesvold is certainly trying – "I run most importantly to raise awareness and generate funds for great causes," he writes in his entry, noting that he ran 100 miles last year from the Capitol in St. Paul to Austin "to raise money to feed 100,000 kids" through Convoy of Hope, a humanitarian organization.

But he hopes his attempt to grace the cover of Runner's Magazine brings attention to his latest cause, the fight against human sex trafficking, the Post Bulletin reports.

And according to his entry profile, he plans to help the global effort by launching an epic 300-mile triathlon next year.

The August 2016 event, called 300M4FREEDOM, features a five-mile swim, a 240-mile bike ride, and a 55-mile run; the funds it raises will go toward two non-profit groups that help rehabilitate survivors of sex slavery, the official website says.

Nesvol tells the Post Bulletin the idea came from his wife after his last big charity run – "if we need to do this again," she said, "we need to do it for human trafficking."

In the meantime, you can vote for him Runner's World Cover Search website.

The contest ends on July 22.

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